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Monthly Archives: February 2017

Recondition Rechargeable Batteries

1. Lead Acid Battery – This is the type of battery is found in your car or truck. They have an indicator built into them to tell use when the battery is good or bad. When the indicator circuit tells us the battery is in poor condition we know it is time to replace it. This means the battery isn’t holding its charge. But do you actually have to replace the battery once it starts to decline. This would be a good idea. However there are ways to prolong its life. It seems when the lead acid battery begins to die the active material that creates it charge are becoming depleted. So the trick is to rejuvenate the active materials.

One of the reasons for this to happen is due to the chemical process known as sulfation. This occurs when sulfur collects on the lead plates inside the battery and therefore impedes the electric current. The recovery process involves placing an epsom salt solution into the battery cells. After this is done the battery needs to be recharged on a slow cycle for a 24 hour period. It should be noted these batteries contain sulfuric acid and the reconditioning process can be very dangerous if not done safely.

2. Lithium Ion Batteries – These are the batteries commonly use to operate your laptop computer, smart phone and power tools. They hold a very large charge relative to their size. If this battery is draining extremely fast or doesn’t hold a charge at all you might be able fix the problem by doing a full recharge. This will involve completely draining it and keeping it on charge for two or three days.

Reconditioning batteries can save you money by extending their life. There are many different methods that can be used to recondition the many different batteries we use in our daily life. Finding the correct one can be time-consuming. It is recommended that you find a guide to help you in this process.

Car Wreckers

Saves you money

Car wreckers generally have a long list of genuine vehicle parts in stock that can be purchased at a very attractive price. Buying second-hand parts from a yard has the potential to save 50% to 90% of the store-bought prices. Before crushing the body of the car the reusable parts are removed with the intention of selling on in the future. So, for the car restorers, gear-heads, or others planning vehicle maintenance, repairs, or an upgrade, a first stop to source the required auto parts or accessories can include the car wreckers.

Environmentally friendly

Car wreckers offer the more eco-friendly solution to help dispose of an old or neglected vehicle. Cars left on barren land or landfill sites will at some point start to leak harmful chemicals or pollutants into the ground or the atmosphere. This will result in long-term damage to the local soil or water sources and make it difficult for the same ground to be used for other purposes in the future.

Nearly 76% of all parts in an automobile can be reused in another car or truck which is appreciated for its ability to give long-term benefits to the planet. Many of the salvaged materials from the wrecked vehicle are reused in the automobile industry. For instance, rubber sourced from an old vehicle can be recycled and used in the production of floor mats, gas pedals, and tires.

Earn a profit

For those planning to have their old vehicles removed by the car wreckers it is possible to get cash reward in return for some of the metallic parts inside the car. After dismantling a vehicle, the yards, rely on a high-powered magnet which has the capacity to easily collect every last piece of scrap metal which is resold to other companies that have a practical need for it.

In addition to collecting the metallic parts, the car wreckers can also drain the vehicle’s fluids like oil, coolant, and gas, which is sold on to other parties or reused in the fully functional vehicle.

Diesel Fuel Injectors Work

Fuel injectors are small electrical components that are used to deliver fuel via a spray directly into the intake manifold in front of the intake valve in a diesel engine. Diesel fuel injectors are quite complicated; the injector has a high micron filter on the top inlet side which corresponds to small hypodermic sized holes on the bottom for the atomizing of the diesel fuel. The diesel fuel acts as a lubricating source for the injector’s internal parts. The main source of failure for injectors is water in the fuel. When water in the fuel displaces the lubricating properties the internal parts wear down quickly and the injector as a whole can fail rather quickly.

Injectors are an extremely important engine component. The injector valve opens and closes at the same rpm as the diesel engine. Typical RPM for diesel engines in North America is around 1800. This equates to roughly 140,000 times per hour! In addition to water in the fuel, injectors are subjected to carbon and dirt particles introduced into the unit via a bad air cleaner element. The type of fuel, grade and additives used also has a significant impact on the life expectancy of the fuel injector. The ECM (Engine Control Module) controls the fuel injectors in most electrical diesel engines. The diesel injectors constantly have power when the key is turned on regardless if the engine is turned over. The ECM grounds the injector, completing the circuit and causing the injector nozzle to open. The ECM after receiving information from various control sensors determines the length of time the injectors need to be grounded to inject the exact amount of fuel given the horsepower output demand from the engine.

The process of diesel injectors opening, closing and dispensing the correct amount of fuel happens in milliseconds. Injector cycle firing is on average completed in 1.5 to 5 milliseconds. Diesel fuel injectors come in different shapes and sizes depending on the engine make and model as well as power demand. Automotive injectors are quite a bit smaller than heavy-duty diesel applications and are measured in cubic inches. There are two types of diesel fuel injectors: the first is called throttle body injection where 1-2 injectors are located in the throttle body itself in the diesel engine and supply a metered amount of mist fuel spray into the intake manifold. This delivery system essentially charges the intake and the intake valve draws the fuel into the cylinder of the engine. The second delivery system, known as individual port type fuel injector, is newer and more fuel efficient. Port type of injection is more efficient than a carburetor since it adjusts to air density and altitude and is not reliant on the manifold vacuum.

With throttle spray injection inefficiency comes when the cylinders closest to the injectors having a better mixture than the ones furthest away. With port type of injection this flaw is eliminated by injecting the same amount of fuel to each cylinder in the engine.

Set Proper Spring Pre Load

Having too much or too little spring tension will negatively affect suspension performance, but in different ways. Too much spring tension can make your suspension feel like it is topping out. This happens because now the shock extends to its maximum length too suddenly, and this may unload your wheels from the road surface. Not enough spring tension can make your suspension bottom out excessively. Knowing these effects can help make the correct adjustments.

Let’s define a few terms to help understand spring pre load effects. The amount of stroke the spring consumes at static ride height from the weight of the vehicle is called “droop.” And the amount of stroke left over at static ride height is called “compression stroke.” The total shock stroke is droop and compression stroke combined.

Equation:

Total Shock Stroke = Droop + Compression Stroke

It is important to understand that spring tension does not affect the spring rate of a linear spring (most coilover systems come with linear springs). For example, increasing spring pre load WILL NOT increase the firmness of your linear spring. However, this WILL increase the amount of compression stroke you have which increases bottoming resistance.

Springs on most coilover systems have to be pre loaded in order to retain a desirable amount of compression stroke at static ride height. For example; if you have a coilover with a 200 lbs/in spring rate carrying 800 lbs of weight, without any pre set spring pre load, the coilover will compress 4″ just from the static 800 lbs of weight acting on it. If this coilover has a total of 5″ of stroke, this only leaves you with 1″ of compression stroke left over! In this scenario you must pre load the spring to insure you have more than 1″ of compression stroke. There is way too much droop in this scenario.

So we now know that spring tension affects droop. But what is the proper amount of droop to have? This varies depending on how much total stroke your coilovers have, so we treat the desired droop as a ratio of total shock stroke. In order to have an appropriate amount of droop, we recommend setting droop to be 30-40% of the total shock stroke (see equation below). Now you know that you have to adjust the spring tension on your coilovers to yield 30-40% droop!

Equation:

Desired Droop = Total Shock Stroke x.35

How to set spring pre load:

You must first measure the total shock stroke of your coilover (including the bump stop length). Then measure how much the coilover compresses when the vehicle is at static ride height. Subtract the compression stroke at static ride height from the total shock stroke to find the droop amount. Adjust spring pre load until suspension droop is between 30-40% of total shock stroke.